News Roundup

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Sep
18
2013

Mark Sypher and his team were in the middle of a construction job when he got a call from Suffolk County telling him to stop what he was doing and head to Bridgehampton.

Under contract with the county, Sypher Construction & Paving works on whatever job the county considers most pressing. On Tuesday, it was installing ramps for turtles along the newly constructed sidewalks on the Bridgehampton/Sag Harbor turnpike.

County...read more »

Sep
16
2013

Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman introduced legislation late last week to expand the county’s role in combating tick-borne illnesses. The legislation requires the division of Suffolk County Vector Control to submit a yearly plan to reduce the incidence of Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses.

Suffolk County controls the spread of insect-borne diseases such as West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis through the...read more »

Sep
11
2013

We cover a lot of issues and controversies here at The Sag Harbor Express. But in recent months, one particular topic has been registering on our radar screen time and time again — and it’s something that has us seriously concerned.

It’s the issue of water quality in the bays and estuaries in Sag Harbor and across the East End. And while the details and specifics may ebb and flow with each story, we’re noticing an overall theme here —...read more »

Sep
11
2013

Environmental consultants said this week that it would cost $3.75 million to install a sewer system to service the Riverside business corridor, and recommended that the required treatment plant be placed on about two acres of Southampton Town-owned land to the south of the State Trooper barracks.

Mary Anne Taylor, an associate with CDM Smith in Massachusetts, and Nicholas Bono, a representative of the Melville engineering firm H2M,...read more »

Sep
10
2013

After years of discussion, final results of a sewer study for the Riverside area were brought to the public Monday night.

Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman set out to explain the new vision for the project and explain next steps.

Residents had some questions concerning what the end cost would be to implement the plan.

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Sep
9
2013

After years of discussion a final sewer study report on the Riverside and Flanders area will be unveiled Monday night.

Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman is expected to attend a meeting of the Flanders, Riverside and Northampton Community Association at 7 p.m. at the David W. Crohan Community Center in Flanders.

At the meeting, a final report will be given about the sewer study, with Schneiderman, along with members of...read more »

Sep
4
2013

Jay Schneiderman walks up and down the Sag Harbor/Bridgehampton Turnpike most days. The Suffolk County Legislator introduces himself to passing constituents, greets familiar commuters and, most importantly, looks for turtles.

Addressing concerns raised by members of the Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt (FLPG) and the South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) that the curbs on the turnpike’s new sidewalk are hazardous to crossing...read more »

Aug
24
2013

Plans for the revitalization of the Riverside and Flanders area continue to take shape.
The Suffolk County Downtown Revitalization Citizens Advisory Panel recently recommended a $15,000 grant toward the construction of a walking trail through county parkland from Flanders Road, or State Route 24, to the Peconic River.

The 5.5-foot wide, 1000-foot long, walking trail would be created using permeable natural stone material. ...read more »

Aug
23
2013

A plan to create a walking trail through Suffolk County parkland to the banks of the Peconic River is now in line to get $15,000 downtown revitalization grant, town and county officials announced Friday.

The trail comes as part of a larger vision to create a true Riverside business district along Route 24 and the traffic circle.

The 5 1/2-foot wide, 1,000-foot long trail will be created using permeable natural stone material and...read more »

Aug
23
2013

If you’re going to eat a lobster on Long Island, it’s highly unlikely these days that it came from the waters of the Long Island Sound — long a huge source of lobsters. That’s because the lobster fishery in the Sound has been decimated.

In Connecticut, the die-off has been blamed on the spraying of toxic mosquito pesticides. Clinching the case was the finding last year of the pesticides methoprene and resmethrin in lobster tissue. Thus...read more »

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